2013 Activities combined

Anglican Church Twente

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St.Mary's of Weldam

 

Chaplaincy in the Diocese of Europe

Sunday Services - Weldam Chapel - 10:30 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 December - Nine Lessons and Carols followed by Christmas Market opening . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 24 December - Midnight Service 22:30 hrs . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Lessons and Carols

 

On the 15th of December our Chapel was again the scene of the traditional Lessons and Carols service. The ladies of the flower guild had again done their utmost to provide the congregation with beautiful floral arrangements.

 

The traditional readings, alternating with Carols and supported by additional musicians, were held. After the service a fellowship get together with members of the congregation and guests was organized outside the Hut. Hot chocolate, mulled wine and cakes were served. Like every year this was very much appreciated by everyone present.

 

On Christmas Eve there is another service commemorating the birth of Jezus. In the text below (Source: Wikipedia) explaining the origin of the Lessons and Carols service this refers to Christmas Eve.

 

The Festival of Nine Lessons and Carols is a service of Christian worship celebrating the birth of Jesus that is traditionally followed at Christmas. The story of the fall of humanity, the promise of the Messiah, and the birth of Jesus is told in nine short Bible readings from Genesis, the prophetic books and the Gospels, interspersed with the singing of Christmas carols, hymns and choir music.

 

The format was based on an Order drawn up by Edward Benson, later Archbishop of Canterbury but at that time Bishop of Truro, in Cornwall, for use on Christmas Eve (24 December) 1880. Tradition says that he organized a 10:00 p.m. service on Christmas Eve in a temporary wooden structure serving as his cathedral and that the purpose of the service was to keep men out of the pubs.

 

The original liturgy has since been adapted and used by other churches all over the world. Lessons and Carols most often occur in Anglican churches. However, numerous Christian denominations have adopted this service, or a variation on this service, as part of their Christmas celebrations. In the UK, the service has become the standard format for schools' Christmas carol services.

 

2013 - Events

Ascension Day picnic

 

Ascencion Day 2013 was once again a very successful event. The weather at first did show some clouds but as the morning progressed the sun did take over and lightened up the Picnic.

 

The congregation had turned up with delicious dishes and everyone did enjoy the great variety of pies, salads, cakes and deserts.

 

Our traditional picnic after the Ascension Day service certainly went with a swing thanks to Carol Van Straten, who treated us to some wellknown Gospel songs. As time progressed, she was joined by an enthusiastic ad hoc backing group displaying hitherto hidden talents on tambourines, bells and vocals.

 

And when it came to Let It Be and The House of the Rising Sun, well, we were all back in the heady days of the 60s!

 

Our sincere thanks go to Jeanet and her tireless team for the wonderful organization & refreshments.

 

Castle Fair

 

Well Done in Weldamshire!

 

It was with both eagerness and trepidation that two novice volunteers tentatively approached the annual Kasteel Weldam English Country Fair on Saturday September 7th. We were met by a gaggle of enthusiastic fellow volunteers organizing goods in (check!), people placed (check!), hats on, badges pinned (check, check!), efficiency and good humour (double check!). With such a collective contribution it was evident before the gates were swung open this was going to be a special day! On arriving we passed through a plethora of enthusiastic stall holders tweaking and refining their wares to full and splendid effect.

 

The array of goods on offer was quite astounding. Ranging from bric-a-brac to antiques, from etchings to art works, quilting, embroidery, millinery and much more. The mix and balance of wares was enough to entice Mr Scrooge himself to part with his hard earned cash! Both “Old Hand” and “First Time” stall holders looked set to have an enjoyable, productive and profitable day with an English twist that would have made Dickens’ Oliver feel at home!

 

The beating heart of any English Fair is its tea room and Kasteel Weldam provided the ultimate location and backdrop for an army of volunteers to make ready the provisions that would delight, refresh and refuel the weariest of soldiers. The camaraderie, willingness and cordiality to get provisions in order for the arrival of a hungry public was evident throughout the morning. With cakes piped and sliced, co ffee pots primed and tea urns brewing, it bore the hall marks and precision of a military campaign.

 

Suddenly − action stations! The bell tolls and the eleven o’clock opening is announced, and the first wave of visitors are welcomed to the fair. The tea room bursts into action as hungry visitors appear. Teas and coffees are poured and collected, fondant fancies are eagerly plated and dispatched, an array of cakes, lovingly baked to perfection grace the tables throughout the day and cause chatter and excitement as people refresh and refuel themselves. The clinking of cups and saucers mingles with periodic bouts of Pipe music and Morris men’s bells – for several moments throughout the day we forgot this was Holland!

 

As the afternoon moved towards evening and the crowds departed the stalls were slowly disassembled. Thanks, speeches, heartfelt words of appreciation and a beautiful bouquet of flowers were presented to our gracious hosts the Count and Countess Solms-Sonnenwalde. After a short prayer giving thanks for the day, voices of the volunteers came together in a musical finale to close what was for us our Weldam Fayre baptism in an imaginary little corner of England in Twente. ‘Twas a grand day out!

 

Elisa and Bernard Hannan

 

Images Lub Gringhuis/Images of Morris Dancers kindly provided by Nicole Zonnebeld.

 

Highland Regiment with impression on their website of the Fair

Harvest Festival

 

Harvest Festival is a celebration of the food grown on the land. Thanksgiving ceremonies and celebrations for a successful harvest are both worldwide and very ancient. In Britain, we have given thanks for successful harvests since pagan times. We celebrate this day by singing, praying and decorating our churches with baskets of fruit and food in a festival known as 'Harvest Festival'.

 

Harvest Festival reminds Christians of all the good things God gives them. This makes them want to share with others who are not so fortunate. In Churches, people bring food from home to a Harvest Festival Service. In our congregation the harvest goods are put up for sale in the Community Centre to benefit our Flower Guild.

 

Remembrance Day

 

Sunday November 10th ‎2013 our congregation did celebrate Remembrance Day.

 

(From Wikipedia) Remembrance Day (also known as Poppy Day or Armistice Day) is a memorial day observed in Commonwealth countries since the end of World War I to remember the members of their armed forces who have died in the line of duty. This day, or alternative dates, are also recognized as special days for war remembrances in many non-Commonwealth countries. Remembrance Day is observed on 11 November to recall the official end of World War I on that date in 1918; hostilities formally ended "at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month" of 1918 with the German signing of the Armistice ("at the 11th hour" refers to the passing of the 11th hour, or 11:00 a.m.)

 

The day was specifically dedicated by King George V on 7 November 1919 as a day of remembrance for members of the armed forces who were killed during World War I. This was possibly done upon the suggestion of Edward George Honey to Wellesley Tudor Pole, who established two ceremonial periods of remembrance based on events in 1917.

 

The red remembrance poppy has become a familiar emblem of Remembrance Day due to the poem "In Flanders Fields". These poppies bloomed across some of the worst battlefields of Flanders in World War I, their brilliant red colour an appropriate symbol for the blood spilled in the war.

 

Images kindly provided by Christiaan Koning (2013)

 

Canon Geoffrey Allen presided a Service held at the Commonwealth War Graves in the Oosterbeek, visited by Royal Hospital Chelsea veterans. See Article

New Organ for the Chapel.

 

On the 3rd of December our new organ was installed in the Chapel.

 

When I walked up towards the Chapel, shortly before two o'clock, sounds from our old organ were dwelling out to the access path. Opening the door to the Chapel, Cor Bosma was playing the last music on the instrument that served for such a long time. The last section of the Toccata and Fugue by J.S. Bach.

 

Shortly afterwards, Louw arrived, as did Everhard. After a few minutes, during Louw and Cor were clearing paper sheets from the organ position, the van from the Orgelcentrum Andante, carrying the new organ rolled in front of the Chapel. The technician, assisted by our organists, quickly disassembled the old organ and took it outside.

 

Then the new organ was rolled into the chapel and lifted on to the platform. Shortly afterwards the foot pedal box was attached and the new bench was positioned. The technician started testing all keys and functions to see if everything was as it should be, closely monitored by Louw and Cor.

 

During the acceptance testing Count Alfred also appeared and seemed very pleased to see that the new organ had arrived. On Sunday last, he said that the organ could be paid from money that had been set aside from an Open Day about 20 years ago.

 

About 30 minutes, after discussions about the sound flavour and richness, Louw Talstra could take his place at the keyboards to experience the power of the new organ as he started with an excerpt of the Toccata and Fugue by J.S. Bach, such a coincidence. After some more adjusting also Cor Bosma did have a go to feel the performance of the new instrument.

 

I hope that by the capable hands of Louw and Cor many beautiful music pieces and songs may be played on the new organ and that it may serve our Chapel for a very long time.

 

Lub Gringhuis

 

Christmas Fair

 

Jeanet and Joyce did their best to set up the Christmas Fair for this year. By looking at the images they have succeeded once again.

 

They had a lot of specially imported English Christmas articles, presents and special cakes and pastry

 

Also the ladies in our congregation have contributed with beautiful Christmas cakes, scones and others nice things.

 

After the Christmas Carols Service on the 15th of December the market was opened and visited by numerous members of our congregation and guests.